Investing in Your Child's Future

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Tuition and Financial Aid

We're thrilled that you may be considering your child’s future at Rowland Hall, where they'll be offered a singular and challenging education.

Our students enjoy small classes and forge meaningful relationships with creative, highly trained teachers. Social and emotional development is nurtured in a supportive environment, while athletic and artistic opportunities abound. As students strive to reach their potential, we help them explore their roles as ethical members of a multicultural world. We're dedicated to building an inclusive school community.

2019–2020 Tuition  
3PreK, Three Days $5,780
3PreK, Five Days $9,540
4PreK, Half Day $9,540
4PreK, Full Day $17,590
4PreK, Flex Day $9,540 plus $51 per afternoon
Kindergarten, Full Day $19,750
Kindergarten, Flex Day $10,400 plus $56 per afternoon
First–Fifth Grades $19,750
Sixth–Eighth Grades $23,850
Ninth–Eleventh Grades $24,200
Twelfth Grade $24,725
International Students (Ninth-Eleventh Grades) $26,200
International Students (Twelfth Grade) $26,725
Beginning School Program Options  
3PreK, Three Days Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday    8:30 am - 11:30 am
3PreK, Five Days Monday through Friday    8:30 am - 11:30 am
4PreK, Half Day* Monday through Friday    8:30 am - 11:30 am
4PreK, Full Day Monday through Friday    8:30 am - 3:15 pm
Kindergarten, Full Day Monday through Friday    8:30 am - 3:15 pm
Kindergarten, Flex Day* Monday through Friday    8:30 am - 11:30 am
3PreK and 4PreK Enrichment** Monday through Friday    11:15 am - 5:30 pm
Kindergarten Enrichment** Monday through Friday    3:15 pm - 5:30 pm

*Flex Day offers the flexibility of choosing a number of full days throughout the year.  
**Enrichment provides a continuing day of stimulating experiences for children in a multi-aged group

Other Expenses and Payment Plans

Other Fees

School lunch, extended day, and transportation are available for additional fees. Winter Sports choices may involve additional fees. Middle School class trips, Upper School Interim, and the Laptop Program computer costs are additional fees.

Technology Requirements

All Middle School students are required to have an iPad. All details such as iPad models, required insurance, applications, etc. will be detailed in the May email/sign-up information.

All Upper School students at Rowland Hall must participate in the Laptop Program, as laptops are used extensively at the school to enhance your student's education. All details such as required insurance, applications, etc. will be detailed in the May email/sign-up information.

Payment Plans

One-Payment Plan

The full amount of tuition is due on July 1. Late payments accrue simple interest at the rate of 18% annually. The Tuition Refund Plan is optional.
 

Two-Payment Plan

Tuition plus a convenience fee is due in two installments on July 1 and November 1. Late payments will accrue simple interest at the rate of 18% annually. Participation in the Tuition Refund Plan is mandatory.
 

Nine-Payment Plan

Tuition plus a convenience fee is due in nine monthly installments beginning July 1. Late payments will accrue simple interest at the rate of 18% annually. Participation in the Tuition Refund Plan is mandatory.
 

Methods of payment

Rowland Hall accepts all major credit cards, debit cards and ACH (electronic) checks. Electronic payments can be made by visiting our online payment page. We also accept paper checks in person in the Business Office.

Paper checks should be mailed to:

Rowland Hall
Attn: Student Accounts
720 Guardsman Way
Salt Lake City, UT 84108
 

Financing your tuition

Families that do not qualify for financial aid, or who qualify but need assistance paying their portion of tuition, may choose to investigate whether they qualify for a tuition loan through Your Tuition Solution.

Meeting the Cost through Financial Aid

Young students play with leaves

 

Rowland Hall values socioeconomic diversity and families with financial need are encouraged to apply for financial aid. Rowland Hall currently provides over $2.6 million in financial aid and scholarships to our students in grades K-12. Please visit our financial aid page for more information and for the financial aid application materials. If you have questions about financial aid, please email Director of Financial Aid Hadley Smith or call him at 801-924-2964. Please note financial aid is not available for international students.

Financial Aid

Where Does an Education at Rowland Hall Lead?

Explore Alumni Stories in Fine Print Magazine

Portrait of a Gap Year: Work, Activism, Writing, Self-Care, and Self-Discovery

Editor’s note: Gap years have long been common in Europe, and they’re on the rise in the US. So what happens when a high-achieving Rowland Hall alum takes a break from the classroom? Read on for our 2018 co-valedictorian’s account.

By Allie Zehner ’18

Ever since middle school, I had my life all planned out: graduate from high school, launch straight into college, graduate from college, and immediately enter grad school or a career. Straying from this pin-straight path didn’t seem like an option; however, here I am, writing this piece at the end of my gap year.

At the end of my junior year, certain projects arose that I was extremely passionate about pursuing. However, I knew that juggling these opportunities with the intensity of school would be extremely challenging.

Looking back, I don’t remember the exact moment I said, “Hey, mom and dad, I’m taking a year between high school and college.” Because this option did not pop up on my radar until eleventh grade, the only way to describe my decision is as the perfect collision of four distinct circumstances. First: at the end of my junior year, certain projects arose that I was extremely passionate about pursuing. However, I knew that juggling these opportunities with the intensity of school would be extremely challenging. Second: in the fall of my senior year, my family hosted two young women, Priya and Winona, who were in the middle of taking gap years to travel the country, interview people about their intersectional identities, and write a book on racial literacy. Third: I met Abby Falik, the founder and CEO of Global Citizen Year, an organization dedicated to making bridge years between high school and university a socially acceptable norm. Fourth: after continuously pushing myself throughout high school and becoming co-valedictorian, I was afraid of burning out. 

So, I committed to Barnard College of Columbia University in New York last spring and asked for a deferral of admission, elucidating my gap year plans. Barnard approved my request, I filled out a one-page form, and just like that, I was taking a gap year. 

And so the year began.

In the summer, I worked part-time jobs and saved some money.

In the fall, I worked with Sonita Alizadeh (pictured top, right, being interviewed by Allie at a Surefire conference), a young activist who uses music as a tool to catalyze social change, particularly looking to end the detrimental traditional practice of child marriage. Through my work with her and a nonprofit, Strongheart Group, I conducted research, interviewed young activists from around the world, and traveled to the United Nations Foundation’s Social Good Summit in New York City. 

In the winter, I started focusing on curating a book about the next generation of young women. Formatted as a collection of essays, I will write about half of the chapters and other teen girls will write the rest. From omnipresent social media to an extremely divided political climate to gun violence, this book will speak to the most pressing, serious issues my generation is facing on our journey to adulthood. Learning through doing, I taught myself how to write a book proposal, draft a query letter, reach out to agents, and build a website. 

In the spring, I was extremely fortunate to travel to Colombia, where I used my Spanish (gracias, Señor Burnett), attended a women’s conference, and shadowed an incredible nonprofit, Juanfe, that works with teen moms in Cartagena. And, coincidentally, I met another teen who is taking a gap year to live in South American cities, work, become fluent in Spanish, and volunteer. I have also spent the spring loving (pretty much) every second of learning how to write a book. 

The other key aspect of this year is that, having struggled with a chronic illness since the seventh grade, I made time to see doctors and get necessary testing. While I still do not know the root cause of my health issues, I am better equipped to manage my symptoms and look after my own well being: two things I did not prioritize in middle and high school.

And that is my gap year in a nutshell. 

Spending a year outside the classroom has given me time to nurture other facets of my persona: I am an activist, daughter, employee, sister, and global citizen. 

Let me just say that taking this year and venturing from the extremely narrow life path I had envisioned has been one of my best decisions. From around the time I could walk, I was in school five days a week, seven hours a day. For 15 years, being a student was absolutely core to my identity. Spending a year outside the classroom has given me time to nurture other facets of my persona: I am an activist, daughter, employee, sister, and global citizen. 

I will be attending university this fall. Contrary to what is sometimes believed about gap years, I will be going back to school with an immensely stronger sense of self, more direction, and a readiness to return to the classroom. I could not be more ecstatic to finish my book throughout freshman year and continue to grow as a person.

Gap years are not for everyone, but they should be considered a viable alternative to going straight to college. My hope is that society recognizes the immense possibilities bridge years can hold.

alumni

Claire Wang at Rowland Hall graduation in 2015.

Rowland Hall alumna and Duke University senior Claire Wang '15 has added a prestigious new title to her already impressive list of achievements: Rhodes Scholar.

Claire Wang holding climate action now sign

The Rhodes Trust on November 17 announced the names of the 32 Americans to win the 2019 scholarship, one of the most famous academic awards available to US college graduates.

Claire emailed some of her former Rowland Hall teachers Sunday, overjoyed to share the news. "I'll be Oxford bound next fall," she wrote. "Thank you all so much for your support over the years."

Claire is the sole Utahn among the 2019 scholars, and one of 21 women—a record for an American Rhodes class. Here's her profile as published by the trust:

"Claire R. Wang, North Salt Lake, is a Duke senior majoring in Environmental Science and Policy. She is a Truman Scholar and a Udall Scholar, and has a perfect GPA. She is President of the Duke Climate Coalition, was appointed by Duke's president to advise on campus sustainability and climate policy, and has led numerous environmental policy campaigns. Claire also has worked at the Rocky Mountain Institute, and for Earthjustice, the Sierra Club and Greenpeace. She aspires to a career as a climate-change policy advocate and to work at a global level to develop clean energy alternatives to replace fossil fuels. Claire will do master's degrees at Oxford in Environmental Change and Management, and Global Governance and Diplomacy."

At Rowland Hall, Claire felt supported and encouraged on her quest to make the world a better place.

Rhodes Scholarships, the oldest and best-known award for international study, provide all expenses for up to four years of study at the University of Oxford in England. Scholars must display academic excellence, good character, leadership skills, and commitment to service.

Claire has previously said she's fortunate to have attended Rowland Hall, where she felt supported and encouraged on her quest to make the world a better place. The valedictorian for the class of 2015 also said she appreciated her alma mater's emphasis on writing, which helped her as a student and an organizer. She credited her middle and upper school debate experience for giving her many of the skills she uses in her advocacy work: "Just like debate, running campaigns involves strategy, negotiation, and analysis," she said. Read our November 2016 Fine Print story about Claire.

More Information

Alumni

Ikwo Frank and peers on National Academy of Medicine stairs

Ikwo Frank '13 and her peers from American University recently took the stage at the National Academy of Medicine to pitch their solution to the sixth-annual DC Public Health Case Challenge. The competition engages teams of students from DC-area universities in an intensive two-week process of researching solutions to a significant public health issue, culminating in the presentation of a proposal to a panel of expert judges at the Academy's annual meeting. This year's challenge was "Reducing Disparities in Cancer and Chronic Disease: Preventing Tobacco Use in African American Adolescents."

Ikwo, who is about six months away from completing her master's degree in health promotion management, joined American's team at the invitation of another program student—she thought it would be a good academic challenge. Plus it's a subject she and her team members are passionate about, which served them well during the strenuous research phase and at the panel presentation on October 14.
 

Left: Ikwo with fellow American University students Liz Fam and Elizabeth Taormina. Right: Ikwo on stage.

Her cohort spent hours working individually and as a team, sharing ideas for the best and most practical ways they could tackle the case. Ikwo, who has been living in Washington DC for almost a year and a half, found herself focusing on what students do after school. "It's a big city," she said. "Where do all these kids go?" Her team devised an idea for an after-school program built around mental health and wellness—the program would help kids become more mindful, teach healthy strategies for coping with stress, and provide a safe space when school lets out.

Ikwo's team devised an idea for an after-school program built around mental health and wellness—the program would help kids become more mindful, teach healthy strategies for coping with stress, and provide a safe space when school lets out.

Even though her team didn't win the competition, Ikwo regards the experience as extremely worthwhile. The conviction they brought to their presentation earned positive reviews from the panel, and the collaborative energy of participants was inspiring. Furthermore, all teams' proposals will be summarized in an upcoming National Academy of Medicine publication.

And there's one more benefit not to be overlooked: the competition requires students to apply a narrow lens—and look for feasible solutions—in a field where the scope and volume of problems often seem daunting. "The health world is so broad, and there's so much work to be done," Ikwo said. "I wish we could save the world, but we have to be realistic. One small thing really does go a long way."

Ikwo is already applying her studies to the greater community. When not in school, she works at the World Bank as a fitness specialist and instructor. Prior to attending American, she earned her bachelor of science from Weber State University in human performance management (the program has since been renamed).

 

Banner photo: 2018 DC Public Health Case Challenge Participants. Photo credit: National Academy of Medicine.

Alumni

New med students in white coats.

The University of Utah School of Medicine welcomed 127 students into its ranks at Friday's annual White Coat Ceremony, and six of of those newly cloaked scholars graduated from Rowland Hall.

Congratulations to our young alumni, pictured above. From left: Madeline Foley '13, Hank Shipman '13, Saeed Shihab '13, Kellyn Maves '12, and Sophie Janes '12 don their new coats Friday, August 10. Not pictured: Emma Naatz '12. (Photo by Julie Shipman)

Both Hank and Emma also competed for Rowmark Ski Academy while at Rowland Hall. Hank has an especially inspiring story—a tragic Rowmark car accident and his subsequent recovery spurred him to pursue a medical degree.

According to the U's med school, the White Coat Ceremony makes student-physicians more aware of their professional responsibilities and conveys that doctors should ultimately "care as well as cure." Watch the ceremony video.

It's no small feat that these six Rowland Hall alums have matriculated to the med school just up the street from their alma mater.

It's no small feat that these six alums have matriculated to the med school just up the street from their alma mater. The U is well-known for its robust health-care community, and U.S. News and World Report lists the med school among the nation's best in research and primary care.

During the White Coat Ceremony, Interim Executive Dean Dr. A. Lorris Betz said the med school received 4,227 applications for the class of 2022. After officials review initial applications, they interview approximately 500 candidates each year. In the comprehensive admissions process, evaluators explore applicants' "motivation for seeking a medical degree, awareness and understanding of the medical profession, leadership, problem-solving skills, understanding of medical ethics, and interpersonal skills," according to the school.

Our alumni who have pursued careers in medicine often credit their well-rounded Rowland Hall education for helping them succeed in that field: read our 2014 story on the subject.

Alumni

You Belong at Rowland Hall