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The graduates in Rowland Hall’s class of 2019 are a diverse and talented group of young people ready to make their mark on the world. During their years at our school, they excelled in the classrooms and laboratories, on the playing field and stage, in service to each other and our greater community, and by living with authenticity, courage, and hope.

This class includes several top-tier debate students, including two winners of the National Speech and Debate Association’s Academic All-American Award and one student who, with her partner, finished third in this year’s Tournament of Champions—the most successful finish in Rowland Hall debate history.

Seniors in this class pushed themselves academically through rigorous coursework during the year supplemented by summer learning at institutions including the University of Utah, Oxford University, Indiana University, and Stanford University. They completed internships with Wasatch Advisors, McNeill Von Maack, Avenues Pet Clinic, and Alliance for a Better Utah, among others, and continued their learning through independent study in subjects including Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, and engineering. This class includes several top-tier debate students, including two winners of the National Speech and Debate Association’s Academic All-American Award and one student who, with her partner, finished third in this year’s Tournament of Champions—the most successful finish in Rowland Hall debate history.

The class of 2019 has no shortage of artists, ranging from dancers and musicians to poets and painters. Beyond performing in Rowland Hall productions, they have graced the stage with the University of Utah’s Youth Theatre Conservatory, the Utah Youth Philharmonic, the Salt Lake Dance Company, and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Several seniors in our Advanced Chamber Ensemble earned superior ratings year after year in state competitions, and one was named concertmaster for the Utah Music Educators Association All-State Orchestra this past winter. These young artists continued their creative studies during the summer at the Interlochen Center for the Arts and at Carnegie Mellon University, and one recently traveled to Australia to perform with Dance and the Child International. One talented young writer won the Jewish Community Center’s Annual Holocaust Poetry Competition, and another teaches poetry classes to children at the Sunnyvale Neighborhood Center.

Six Academic All-State and nine Academic All-Region honorees led seven of our athletic teams to earn the Top 2A Team GPA award for their sport this year, as designated by the Utah Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association. Of the five seniors in Rowmark Ski Academy, all competed in the Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) Western Region Junior Championships, and two competed in the U.S. Junior National Championships and U.S. National Championships.

Our seniors led our athletics program to top-five finishes in the Deseret News 2A All-Sports Awards each year of their high school careers. They captured 27 Region and nine State titles as teams. Eight of our seniors were named All-State, nine earned All-Region honors, and five were selected to play in the postseason All-Star games of their respective sports this year. Six Academic All-State and nine Academic All-Region honorees led seven of our athletic teams to earn the Top 2A Team GPA award for their sport this year, as designated by the Utah Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association. Of the five seniors in Rowmark Ski Academy, all competed in the Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) Western Region Junior Championships, and two competed in the U.S. Junior National Championships and U.S. National Championships. Their ski-racing successes include seven race wins the past two seasons, including a first-place in slalom in the FIS Western Region Junior Championship, nine total FIS podium finishes and a third place in the Intermountain Division Cup overall downhill standings. Outside of school, members of the class of 2019 pursued diverse athletics interests: two are avid sailors, one is a competitive CrossFit athlete, one is the winningest wrestler in the history of West High School, and another won the Wendy’s High School Heisman Award for his aptitude and performance as a baseball player.

Every graduating class includes students who have devoted countless hours volunteering throughout the community, and the people and organizations touched by our current students include: the National Ability Center, Women of the World, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Angel Flight West, the Road Home book club, Intermountain Healthcare, Girl Up, the Utah Pride Center, and the International Rescue Committee. These seniors also embraced leadership roles on campus, whether tutoring Middle School students, serving as college counseling ambassadors, or advocating for the work of our Queer-Straight Alliance. One attended the People of Color Conference and subsequently formed a thriving affinity group at Rowland Hall, another has been an active leader in the Salt Lake City chapter of B’nai B’rith Youth International since eighth grade, and two were instrumental in organizing last spring’s local March for Our Lives. 

During their years at our school, they excelled in the classrooms and laboratories, on the playing field and stage, in service to each other and our greater community, and by living with authenticity, courage, and hope.

A significant number of these students have also held down jobs while in school, ranging from hostessing at restaurants to working as mechanics to supporting the office management for their family businesses. Balancing school, service, and work has still not deterred them from passion projects, whether that means backpacking across Wyoming, producing music, or creating and managing a sports website with a staff of 12 writers. 

The 71 seniors in Rowland Hall’s graduating class earned admission to 114 different colleges and universities, and will matriculate to 44 institutions across the United States and Canada this fall. Over half the senior class was offered at least one merit scholarship to attend college. Yet college is far from the destination for these young adults. Rather, it is merely a stepping stone on their journeys to living lives of purpose and impact. 

Congratulations to the class of 2019: you have already achieved many great things in your young lives, and we know the best is yet to come.

Students

Achievements of the Class of 2019

The graduates in Rowland Hall’s class of 2019 are a diverse and talented group of young people ready to make their mark on the world. During their years at our school, they excelled in the classrooms and laboratories, on the playing field and stage, in service to each other and our greater community, and by living with authenticity, courage, and hope.

This class includes several top-tier debate students, including two winners of the National Speech and Debate Association’s Academic All-American Award and one student who, with her partner, finished third in this year’s Tournament of Champions—the most successful finish in Rowland Hall debate history.

Seniors in this class pushed themselves academically through rigorous coursework during the year supplemented by summer learning at institutions including the University of Utah, Oxford University, Indiana University, and Stanford University. They completed internships with Wasatch Advisors, McNeill Von Maack, Avenues Pet Clinic, and Alliance for a Better Utah, among others, and continued their learning through independent study in subjects including Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, and engineering. This class includes several top-tier debate students, including two winners of the National Speech and Debate Association’s Academic All-American Award and one student who, with her partner, finished third in this year’s Tournament of Champions—the most successful finish in Rowland Hall debate history.

The class of 2019 has no shortage of artists, ranging from dancers and musicians to poets and painters. Beyond performing in Rowland Hall productions, they have graced the stage with the University of Utah’s Youth Theatre Conservatory, the Utah Youth Philharmonic, the Salt Lake Dance Company, and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Several seniors in our Advanced Chamber Ensemble earned superior ratings year after year in state competitions, and one was named concertmaster for the Utah Music Educators Association All-State Orchestra this past winter. These young artists continued their creative studies during the summer at the Interlochen Center for the Arts and at Carnegie Mellon University, and one recently traveled to Australia to perform with Dance and the Child International. One talented young writer won the Jewish Community Center’s Annual Holocaust Poetry Competition, and another teaches poetry classes to children at the Sunnyvale Neighborhood Center.

Six Academic All-State and nine Academic All-Region honorees led seven of our athletic teams to earn the Top 2A Team GPA award for their sport this year, as designated by the Utah Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association. Of the five seniors in Rowmark Ski Academy, all competed in the Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) Western Region Junior Championships, and two competed in the U.S. Junior National Championships and U.S. National Championships.

Our seniors led our athletics program to top-five finishes in the Deseret News 2A All-Sports Awards each year of their high school careers. They captured 27 Region and nine State titles as teams. Eight of our seniors were named All-State, nine earned All-Region honors, and five were selected to play in the postseason All-Star games of their respective sports this year. Six Academic All-State and nine Academic All-Region honorees led seven of our athletic teams to earn the Top 2A Team GPA award for their sport this year, as designated by the Utah Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association. Of the five seniors in Rowmark Ski Academy, all competed in the Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) Western Region Junior Championships, and two competed in the U.S. Junior National Championships and U.S. National Championships. Their ski-racing successes include seven race wins the past two seasons, including a first-place in slalom in the FIS Western Region Junior Championship, nine total FIS podium finishes and a third place in the Intermountain Division Cup overall downhill standings. Outside of school, members of the class of 2019 pursued diverse athletics interests: two are avid sailors, one is a competitive CrossFit athlete, one is the winningest wrestler in the history of West High School, and another won the Wendy’s High School Heisman Award for his aptitude and performance as a baseball player.

Every graduating class includes students who have devoted countless hours volunteering throughout the community, and the people and organizations touched by our current students include: the National Ability Center, Women of the World, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Angel Flight West, the Road Home book club, Intermountain Healthcare, Girl Up, the Utah Pride Center, and the International Rescue Committee. These seniors also embraced leadership roles on campus, whether tutoring Middle School students, serving as college counseling ambassadors, or advocating for the work of our Queer-Straight Alliance. One attended the People of Color Conference and subsequently formed a thriving affinity group at Rowland Hall, another has been an active leader in the Salt Lake City chapter of B’nai B’rith Youth International since eighth grade, and two were instrumental in organizing last spring’s local March for Our Lives. 

During their years at our school, they excelled in the classrooms and laboratories, on the playing field and stage, in service to each other and our greater community, and by living with authenticity, courage, and hope.

A significant number of these students have also held down jobs while in school, ranging from hostessing at restaurants to working as mechanics to supporting the office management for their family businesses. Balancing school, service, and work has still not deterred them from passion projects, whether that means backpacking across Wyoming, producing music, or creating and managing a sports website with a staff of 12 writers. 

The 71 seniors in Rowland Hall’s graduating class earned admission to 114 different colleges and universities, and will matriculate to 44 institutions across the United States and Canada this fall. Over half the senior class was offered at least one merit scholarship to attend college. Yet college is far from the destination for these young adults. Rather, it is merely a stepping stone on their journeys to living lives of purpose and impact. 

Congratulations to the class of 2019: you have already achieved many great things in your young lives, and we know the best is yet to come.

Students

Explore Our Most Recent Stories

Students at the 2020 Changemaker Chapel

Every January, Rowland Hall’s Lower School spends the month celebrating the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., culminating in a Changemaker Chapel the week of MLK Day.

In preparation for this year’s Changemaker Chapel on January 21, and in line with Rowland Hall’s focus on inspiring students who make a difference, all Lower School classes read Say Something by Peter H. Reynolds. The book explores the concept of a changemaker: someone who recognizes that a positive change is needed and has the courage to say something to make a difference.

Changemaker: someone who recognizes that a positive change is needed and has the courage to say something to make a difference.

After learning how small changes lead to bigger ones, students were asked to participate in the Changemaker 2020 Challenge, a collection of 20 mini acts of kindness, in the days leading up to chapel. They also created a community art installation made up of messages of changemaking actions, which is displayed outside St. Margaret’s Chapel on the McCarthey Campus.

We invite you to enjoy the following video, which highlights our students’ work and the 2020 Changemaker Chapel.

Ethical Education

A Rowland Hall Lower School class

The princiPALS are back.

In the second episode of Rowland Hall’s new podcast, Beginning School Principal Emma Wellman and Lower School Principal Jij de Jesus are tackling the subject of academic rigor.

What exactly is it?

Is it a good thing?

What does it look like for students during their early childhood and elementary school years?

While, for many, the term academic rigor is simply a way to describe curriculum difficulty, the princiPALS show how it encompasses accessing, evaluating, and using knowledge—and what that looks like today, when students can instantly retrieve vast quantities of information on the internet.

In an ever-changing world, it is more important than ever to teach students how to think, not what to think.

In an ever-changing world, the princiPALS explain, it is more important than ever to teach students how to think, not what to think. “We need students who know their academic content, but also can apply it in new and novel ways,” said Jij. In other words: it’s less about what students know, but when and how they use knowledge that will best prepare them for the future. While traditional education methods focused on memorizing and regurgitating facts to display knowledge, today’s students thrive when they joyfully engage in the learning process, successfully evaluate and apply knowledge, and collaborate with others.

We invite you to join Emma and Jij, along with host Conor Bentley ’01, as they discuss the ways educators, parents, and caregivers can help children become engaged, flexible, deep thinkers. Listeners will also enjoy practical tips that will help them raise lifelong learners and future innovators. 

Episode 2 can now be found on Rowland Hall’s website, Stitcher, or Apple Podcasts. And be sure to check out episode 1, “Building Resilience in Children,” if you haven’t already.

Community

Sixth graders at 2019 UN Civil Society Conference

In August 2019, when the United Nations (UN) held its 68th Civil Society Conference in Salt Lake City, Rowland Hall administrators seized the moment and took the entire sixth grade to the event.

“We wanted the sixth graders to take advantage of this historic opportunity to attend a UN conference for the first time outside of New York and San Francisco,” said Ryan Hoglund, director of ethical education. “Because the UN Sustainable Development Goals are a unifying theme in the Middle School sixth- and seventh-grade curriculums, the opportunity was too good to pass up.”

So on August 26, the sixth graders—then in their second week of the school year—traveled to the Salt Palace Convention Center, where they met UN representatives from across the globe and participated in significant conversations around the conference’s theme of building inclusive and sustainable cities and communities. In addition to exposing the students to some of the larger ideas they would be examining over the year, the conference served as an important jumping-off point for an exciting new assignment: empathy-to-impact projects. 

Brought to Rowland Hall by sixth-grade social studies teacher Mary Jo Marker, empathy-to-impact is designed to get students to think more deeply about global issues and how they can take steps to make a difference in the world. For its inaugural year at the school, Mary Jo asked students to choose projects that support the second UN Sustainable Development Goal: Zero Hunger. The assignment, she explained, is for each person to pick one action in support of that goal, research it, and then find a way to share their work with the larger community. Though the steps are simple, the project is intended to make a big impact in how students think about the world around them and their place within it.

My goal is that they experience an opportunity to practice their empathy, solidifying social justice work in the future.—Mary Jo Marker, sixth-grade social studies teacher

“My goal is that they experience an opportunity to practice their empathy, solidifying social justice work in the future,” Mary Jo said.

The project is also an exciting chance for the newly minted middle schoolers to take on more autonomy in their learning: they choose their research subjects and community group, as well as set their own timelines (the only requirement is to complete projects before the end of the school year). Mary Jo explained that this freedom empowers students by giving them more opportunity to think deeply about their topics and find creative ways to approach them. It also helps them to understand the power they have to make change, even at a young age—a major goal of a Rowland Hall education.

“We want our students to see themselves as changemakers in their communities,” Ryan said,  “and find their voice around issues that give them a sense of purpose and inspire them to learn for life.”

Six months in, students are hard at work researching and presenting on a variety of topics that address the Zero Hunger goal—such as food waste, malnutrition, supporting local farms, and finding ways to provide healthy, safe food to low-income families—and making contacts throughout the community. Some students, like Samira Eller, are also finding ways to make connections between Rowland Hall’s campuses. While researching monocropping, the practice of growing the same crop on a plot of land year after year, she realized that she could educate elementary schoolers on the topic, helping them to not only understand how they can make an impact at a young age, but also closing the circle on one of her biggest takeaways from the Civil Society Conference.

“Hearing from so many young people from different parts of the world showed me that it is always possible to make a difference in the world, no matter your circumstances,” she said. 

Samira decided that Rowland Hall’s fourth graders would be at an ideal age to grasp the concept. Plus, she added, “I enjoy enlightening younger kids and getting to see them understand things and learn.” In January, she presented her findings to the entire fourth grade on the McCarthey Campus, emphasizing the importance of diversifying crops and even throwing in some of the surprising facts she discovered in her research—for example, “the Cavendish banana—that yellow one you find in almost all of Utah’s mass groceries—is grown entirely in monoculture, even though it is the least flavorful of many different bananas,” she said.

Samira Eller presenting to fourth graders

Samira Eller presenting her findings on monocropping to Rowland Hall's fourth graders.

The fourth graders loved it. Teacher Tyler Stack commented, “The students really enjoy when a peer from the middle or upper school comes to speak to them. They were engaged with the topic and excited to see what they are going to study the next few years.”

I learned that my voice can make a big difference and that making an impact in the world isn’t always about the big things, but more the little ones.Those students can almost certainly look forward to conducting their own empathy-to-impact research one day. Mary Jo is already planning on repeating the assignment next year, and will be opening it up to other Sustainable Development Goals. She is excited to see the kinds of ideas students will continue to come up with—and how it will improve their confidence as global citizens, as it has with Samira.

“I learned that my voice can make a big difference and that making an impact in the world isn’t always about the big things, but more the little ones,” Samira reflected. “Sometimes something might seem impossibly hard and dangerous, but in reality all it takes is a second to tell someone, ‘Hey, did you know…’ to make a pretty big dent.”


Top photo: Rowland Hall sixth graders hold cards displaying the UN's Sustainable Development Goals while attending the 68th Civil Society Conference in Salt Lake City in August 2019.

Ethical Education

Micha Nenbee, Ke'ea Ramirez, and Katy Dark in Seattle

By Ke’ea Ramirez, Class of 2021

In November 2018, then-sophomore Ke’ea Ramirez was one of six Rowland Hall students who traveled to Nashville, Tennessee, to attend the Student Diversity Leadership Conference (SDLC). The SDLC takes place each year in conjunction with the National Association of Independent Schools’ (NAIS) People of Color Conference, the flagship of NAIS’ commitment to equity and justice in teaching, learning, and organizational development. As described on their website, the SDLC gives student leaders in grades nine through twelve opportunities to develop cross-cultural communication skills, design effective strategies for social justice practice through dialogue and the arts, and learn the foundations of allyship and networking principles. In addition to large group sessions, students join family groups that allow for smaller unit dialogue and sharing, as well as affinity groups, which gather people with common interests, backgrounds, and experiences. Each participating school is allowed to send up to six students to the SDLC, with conference attendance limited to 1,600 students.

Despite initial hesitation, Ke’ea quickly found herself inspired by the multiracial, multicultural gathering of student leaders and, since then, has sought out opportunities to engage with students from around the country—including by attending another SDLC in November 2019. She shares the story of her first conference experience below.


When my mom told me that she had signed me up for a diversity conference, I was very skeptical and hesitant to go. She told me that it was a good learning opportunity and that I would appreciate the experience. I did not want to do it, and as soon as I looked at the schedule, I decided that the conference would not only be a terrible time, but also that I would have no time for sleep or homework. The schedule was busy and consisted of me waking up at 6 every morning, walking to a conference outside in the freezing cold, getting 45 minutes for lunch, going back to the conference, and then returning to the hotel at 10 pm. Even though it was only a few days, I did not want to go.

On November 28, I got on the plane to Nashville with five other students from Rowland Hall. The next morning, when I got to the conference, we sat in a room with hundreds of other students from all over America. I felt very overwhelmed; I was in a different state on the complete other side of the country, surrounded by so many other kids and adults. I was amazed by how many students actually went to the conference, and, surprisingly, found myself inspired by the speakers. At that moment I remember thinking, “Maybe the conference won’t be as bad as I thought.” After the opening ceremony, my mindset changed a little bit, going from, “This is going to be the worst thing ever,” to, “Maybe I can tolerate this for a few days.”

I felt like I had known these other students my entire life. I made best friends in less than an hour and connected with so many people.

Next, we shuffled into our smaller family groups of around 50 students. If you know me, you know that I am not very outgoing and I tend to be shy. In addition, I was only a sophomore; I thought that I would be trampled by all the other junior and senior students. However, after the first activity (a classic ice-breaker game), I felt like I had known these other students my entire life. I made best friends in less than an hour and connected with so many people from around the country. I felt as though I had actually made a new family, despite my initial reluctance. My thoughts then changed again, from, “Maybe I can tolerate this for a few days,” to, “I am so happy that my mom forced me to go.”

Ke'ea Ramirez with her SDLC family group

Ke'ea's SDLC family group, which met several times throughout the conference to engage in dialogue and sharing.

We spent nearly eight hours in family groups, and then we moved on to affinity groups. I ended up going to the Asian/Pacific Islander affinity group; this group was at least three times as big as my family group. A lot of the students that went to the conference with me from Rowland Hall also attended this affinity group, and some of my new friends from my family group were present. Initially, I thought that affinity groups were where people got together and talked about problems that we could all relate to. However, there was a lot more than I had expected. While we did talk about serious topics, we also had a lot of fun, and, similar to the family group, I connected with people and, again, made best friends fast.

This conference was so important to me because all students were represented, and it is always important to hear the issues of others and to become aware of what is happening around the country.

The first thing we did the next day was to separate into smaller groups and have a singing competition. While it sounds embarrassing and silly, it was actually so much fun, and it allowed us to all come together, gain courage, and laugh. I realized that my preconceived notion of the conference was wrong. What I expected was not what was reality. It was at that moment when my mindset, once again, changed from, “I am so happy that my mom forced me to go,” to, “I never, ever want to leave this conference.”

After we left Nashville and the SDLC behind, I reflected on my experience and realized how much I loved the conference and how glad I was that I went. My favorite session was either family groups or affinity groups because of how many amazing people I met, all the fun activities we did, and how much we ended up feeling like a true family. I made lifelong friends that I am still close to and talk to all the time; I also became even closer to the Rowland Hall students who went to the conference. This conference was so important to me as well because all students were represented, and it is always important to hear the issues of others and to become aware of what is happening around the country.

Even though I wasn’t initially excited to attend, the SDLC turned out to be one of my best experiences in high school—and I immediately signed up for two more conferences when I returned: the 2019 Northwest Association of Independent Schools’ Student Diversity Leadership Retreat in Portland, Oregon, and the 2019 SDLC in Seattle, Washington. I will also be returning to Seattle this March in a leadership role: I’m going to help run affinity spaces and mentor middle school students at the 2020 Student Diversity Leadership Retreat. I am excited to be working with younger students and I hope that they will be just as inspired and motivated as I was.


Top photo, from left: Rowland Hall students Micha Nenbee, Ke'ea Ramirez, and Katy Dark took a break from the 2019 SLDC to explore Seattle's famous Pike Place Market. (Photos courtesy Ke'ea Ramirez)

Ethical Education

You Belong at Rowland Hall