Custom Class: post-landing-hero

Mom Tonya Pickron was surprised by her daughter Lindsay's response to the routine question, "What's your favorite subject in school?" The fourth grader's answer: math.
"Lindsay has always been good at math, but she's never showed the confidence in it that she does now," Tonya said. "Marianne Jenkins has a way of teaching that gets Lindsay fired up. Now, Lindsay not only loves being challenged with rigorous math problems, but she's also interested in architecture. It's like she is becoming this little STEM girl."
 
Since the implementation of Rowland Hall's 2014 Strategic Plan, teachers have increasingly engaged in professional development to help us achieve goal 2—provide an outstanding math and science program. Last summer, when Marianne shared an interest in pursuing a math endorsement, Lower School Principal Jij de Jesus sent her to a workshop at Stanford University. "I just died—I was so excited," she said. "I sat right up front. It was so much fun."

At Stanford, Marianne met Jo Boaler, world-renowned math professor, math-education author, and founder of YouCubed, a Stanford center that provides teachers with math-education resources. Marianne learned about mathematical mindset, a technique that adapts Carol Dweck's theory of growth mindset and applies it specifically to math education. "So many kids label themselves as not being 'math people,' but everyone is a math person," the Rowland Hall teacher said. The Stanford workshop taught her how to talk to students about brain development and making mistakes. Now, Marianne writes three math problems on her classroom board twice a week, and one is always an extra-challenging word problem. Sometimes kids answer incorrectly. But because of the classroom culture, they can comfortably discuss where they went wrong. "When they think it through, they get a stomp stomp clap clap from their peers, acknowledging that their brains grew," Marianne said. "The kids have really begun to celebrate their mistakes and embrace the struggle because they understand that's part of their growth."

The workshop influenced me to believe that kids can do way more than we think they can. They know that if something isn't hard, they're not learning. I want every student to be challenged. They know I expect a lot out of them, but they also know I care a lot about them. It's an equally tough and nurturing environment, a combination that stimulates growth.—Marianne Jenkins, fourth-grade teacher

Students have loved the advanced activities from Jo Boaler's workshop and workbooks. The problems are often at a sixth-grade level, but Marianne presents them in a way that's appropriate for her students' brain development, and the fourth graders find solutions with modeling and simple algebra. "The workshop influenced me to believe that kids can do way more than we think they can," the teacher said. "They know that if something isn't hard, they're not learning. I want every student to be challenged. They know I expect a lot out of them, but they also know I care a lot about them. It's an equally tough and nurturing environment, a combination that stimulates growth."

Growth in the classroom is just as important for students as it is for educators. Because of leadership gifts to the Annual Fund, Rowland Hall's teachers are offered professional-development opportunities—just like Marianne's workshop—that directly enhance their students' academic experiences. Think of it like a math problem; the transitive property of equality says that if a=b, and b=c, then a=c.

(a) Annual Fund = (b) Support for Faculty/Staff Professional Development
(b) Support for Faculty/Staff Professional Development = (c) Student Growth and Thriving Kids
(a) Annual Fund = (c) Student Growth and Thriving Kids

It's simple math. Your contributions make a tremendous difference in the lives of Rowland Hall's students. Thank you so much for your support.

Academics

Annual Fund Sparks Young Minds
Mom Tonya Pickron was surprised by her daughter Lindsay's response to the routine question, "What's your favorite subject in school?" The fourth grader's answer: math.
"Lindsay has always been good at math, but she's never showed the confidence in it that she does now," Tonya said. "Marianne Jenkins has a way of teaching that gets Lindsay fired up. Now, Lindsay not only loves being challenged with rigorous math problems, but she's also interested in architecture. It's like she is becoming this little STEM girl."
 
Since the implementation of Rowland Hall's 2014 Strategic Plan, teachers have increasingly engaged in professional development to help us achieve goal 2—provide an outstanding math and science program. Last summer, when Marianne shared an interest in pursuing a math endorsement, Lower School Principal Jij de Jesus sent her to a workshop at Stanford University. "I just died—I was so excited," she said. "I sat right up front. It was so much fun."

At Stanford, Marianne met Jo Boaler, world-renowned math professor, math-education author, and founder of YouCubed, a Stanford center that provides teachers with math-education resources. Marianne learned about mathematical mindset, a technique that adapts Carol Dweck's theory of growth mindset and applies it specifically to math education. "So many kids label themselves as not being 'math people,' but everyone is a math person," the Rowland Hall teacher said. The Stanford workshop taught her how to talk to students about brain development and making mistakes. Now, Marianne writes three math problems on her classroom board twice a week, and one is always an extra-challenging word problem. Sometimes kids answer incorrectly. But because of the classroom culture, they can comfortably discuss where they went wrong. "When they think it through, they get a stomp stomp clap clap from their peers, acknowledging that their brains grew," Marianne said. "The kids have really begun to celebrate their mistakes and embrace the struggle because they understand that's part of their growth."

The workshop influenced me to believe that kids can do way more than we think they can. They know that if something isn't hard, they're not learning. I want every student to be challenged. They know I expect a lot out of them, but they also know I care a lot about them. It's an equally tough and nurturing environment, a combination that stimulates growth.—Marianne Jenkins, fourth-grade teacher

Students have loved the advanced activities from Jo Boaler's workshop and workbooks. The problems are often at a sixth-grade level, but Marianne presents them in a way that's appropriate for her students' brain development, and the fourth graders find solutions with modeling and simple algebra. "The workshop influenced me to believe that kids can do way more than we think they can," the teacher said. "They know that if something isn't hard, they're not learning. I want every student to be challenged. They know I expect a lot out of them, but they also know I care a lot about them. It's an equally tough and nurturing environment, a combination that stimulates growth."

Growth in the classroom is just as important for students as it is for educators. Because of leadership gifts to the Annual Fund, Rowland Hall's teachers are offered professional-development opportunities—just like Marianne's workshop—that directly enhance their students' academic experiences. Think of it like a math problem; the transitive property of equality says that if a=b, and b=c, then a=c.

(a) Annual Fund = (b) Support for Faculty/Staff Professional Development
(b) Support for Faculty/Staff Professional Development = (c) Student Growth and Thriving Kids
(a) Annual Fund = (c) Student Growth and Thriving Kids

It's simple math. Your contributions make a tremendous difference in the lives of Rowland Hall's students. Thank you so much for your support.

Academics

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