Whether you grab a bag of Goldfish or a box of Sour Patch Kids, choosing the right snack can be a sticky situation. From savory to sugary, there are a variety of snacks to choose from. When you run into a gas station for a quick bite or need a snack to boost your mood, what do you grab? In this article, we will determine the all-time favorite snacks of the student body and when and why they chose them. 

Each season has a different vibe, and with a different vibe come different snacks to match. We asked a plethora of students what their favorite season is and what food comes to mind when they think of that season. Many students said their favorite season is fall, and among them was Chase Noteware, a freshman at Rowland Hall. She said, “in the fall, when school is starting, I tend to have many mental breakdowns and a nice cold pickle is my mental breakdown go-to.” The next favorite fall food was freshman Frances Hodson’s: pumpkin seeds. She prefers pumpkin seeds because “in California each year there is a big pumpkin festival, and the seeds remind me of home.”

The next favorite season was spring and early summer. As the sun starts to come out and it becomes warmer, people tend to lean towards cooler foods. As Julia Simonsen, the food service director at Rowland Hall, said, “with the warmer weather, ice cream sales [in the school cafe] are taking over.” In these warmer seasons, other popular foods can be “a cold variety of berries” or “a nice fresh pasta salad my mom makes when we do a lake trip,” said freshman Lily Jaffe. These snacks are integrated into each season and have a selection of fun and happy memories behind them.

With finals comes lots of studying, which means lots of snacks for many. While studying, some people like to enjoy sweet snacks, while others prefer healthy ones. According to a Northcentral University article,“Best Brain Foods for Studying and Memory Boosts,” healthy snacks tend to be a better option when studying. Foods like broccoli and avocados that contain vitamins B, C, and K help your memory and concentration. Along with vitamins C and K, blueberries contain gallic acid, which can protect the brain from stress. Although healthy foods tend to be better for studying, many students prefer snacky foods. Rowland Hall freshman Angus Hickman likes Goldfish when he studies because “it’s portable so you bring it and study anywhere, it has many flavors and it’s crunchy.” Faculty member Lisa Miranda enjoys candy while working. She says she “eat[s] [her] feelings through snacks when stressed.” Other snack preferences include cookies, pasta, and gummy worms. However, some students don’t like to study with food. Freshman Phoebe LaBelle doesn’t like to snack while studying because “it can be messy and distracting.” While in reality, individuals’ study snack choices might not be the best choice for stimulation, their favorite snacks work for them.

Along with study snacks come study drinks. Some individuals, including Lisa Miranda and Joel Long, consider themselves to be “caffeine dependent.” The Productive Engineer’s article, “Should You Drink Coffee While Studying? The Answer May Surprise You,” explains that water is the best study option. By hydrating, you improve your brain's functions, and dehydration can eventually start to shrink the brain. Consistently drinking water can help your focus, creativity, and memory. However, most students' choices tend to lean more towards drinks like energy drinks, iced tea, coffee, and soda. Anne Wolfer, a faculty member, chooses to work while drinking lemon water, and that seems to help her in the long run. While caffeine can give you a nice temporary burst of energy while studying, the most effective drink is just water.

 How does food affect your mood? When people are down in the dumps, they tend to either overeat or not eat at all. According to the odyssey website, the best snack to eat when sad is chocolate. Chocolate is a sweet treat and can be known for boosting your mood and serotonin levels. Members of the Rowland Hall community have a wide range of mood-boosting snacks including Ms. Wolfer’s pesto pasta, Reese's cups, and other chocolate treats. Lisa Miranda told us that she prefers cheese. “Any cheese can solve anything, but when I'm in a bad mood, I will allow myself to splurge on a block of Trader Joe's Irish cheddar to get back to where I need to be.” Ms. Miranda told us that she has always loved cheese and that she feels that there is a cheese for every situation or emotion. On the other hand, Phoebe said she enjoys eating Reese's peanut butter cups for no other reason than “they are just delicious and make me happy.” Others told us that they don't rely on food or snacks to make them feel better. 

As you can see, there is a snack for every occasion. Whether it’s a big wheel of cheese or pasta salad on a summer lake day, food plays a tremendous role in everyday life. Hopefully this article helps guide you to the most beneficial feeling foods.

A snack for every occasion
Bea Martin and Claire Hersh

Whether you grab a bag of Goldfish or a box of Sour Patch Kids, choosing the right snack can be a sticky situation. From savory to sugary, there are a variety of snacks to choose from. When you run into a gas station for a quick bite or need a snack to boost your mood, what do you grab? In this article, we will determine the all-time favorite snacks of the student body and when and why they chose them. 

Each season has a different vibe, and with a different vibe come different snacks to match. We asked a plethora of students what their favorite season is and what food comes to mind when they think of that season. Many students said their favorite season is fall, and among them was Chase Noteware, a freshman at Rowland Hall. She said, “in the fall, when school is starting, I tend to have many mental breakdowns and a nice cold pickle is my mental breakdown go-to.” The next favorite fall food was freshman Frances Hodson’s: pumpkin seeds. She prefers pumpkin seeds because “in California each year there is a big pumpkin festival, and the seeds remind me of home.”

The next favorite season was spring and early summer. As the sun starts to come out and it becomes warmer, people tend to lean towards cooler foods. As Julia Simonsen, the food service director at Rowland Hall, said, “with the warmer weather, ice cream sales [in the school cafe] are taking over.” In these warmer seasons, other popular foods can be “a cold variety of berries” or “a nice fresh pasta salad my mom makes when we do a lake trip,” said freshman Lily Jaffe. These snacks are integrated into each season and have a selection of fun and happy memories behind them.

With finals comes lots of studying, which means lots of snacks for many. While studying, some people like to enjoy sweet snacks, while others prefer healthy ones. According to a Northcentral University article,“Best Brain Foods for Studying and Memory Boosts,” healthy snacks tend to be a better option when studying. Foods like broccoli and avocados that contain vitamins B, C, and K help your memory and concentration. Along with vitamins C and K, blueberries contain gallic acid, which can protect the brain from stress. Although healthy foods tend to be better for studying, many students prefer snacky foods. Rowland Hall freshman Angus Hickman likes Goldfish when he studies because “it’s portable so you bring it and study anywhere, it has many flavors and it’s crunchy.” Faculty member Lisa Miranda enjoys candy while working. She says she “eat[s] [her] feelings through snacks when stressed.” Other snack preferences include cookies, pasta, and gummy worms. However, some students don’t like to study with food. Freshman Phoebe LaBelle doesn’t like to snack while studying because “it can be messy and distracting.” While in reality, individuals’ study snack choices might not be the best choice for stimulation, their favorite snacks work for them.

Along with study snacks come study drinks. Some individuals, including Lisa Miranda and Joel Long, consider themselves to be “caffeine dependent.” The Productive Engineer’s article, “Should You Drink Coffee While Studying? The Answer May Surprise You,” explains that water is the best study option. By hydrating, you improve your brain's functions, and dehydration can eventually start to shrink the brain. Consistently drinking water can help your focus, creativity, and memory. However, most students' choices tend to lean more towards drinks like energy drinks, iced tea, coffee, and soda. Anne Wolfer, a faculty member, chooses to work while drinking lemon water, and that seems to help her in the long run. While caffeine can give you a nice temporary burst of energy while studying, the most effective drink is just water.

 How does food affect your mood? When people are down in the dumps, they tend to either overeat or not eat at all. According to the odyssey website, the best snack to eat when sad is chocolate. Chocolate is a sweet treat and can be known for boosting your mood and serotonin levels. Members of the Rowland Hall community have a wide range of mood-boosting snacks including Ms. Wolfer’s pesto pasta, Reese's cups, and other chocolate treats. Lisa Miranda told us that she prefers cheese. “Any cheese can solve anything, but when I'm in a bad mood, I will allow myself to splurge on a block of Trader Joe's Irish cheddar to get back to where I need to be.” Ms. Miranda told us that she has always loved cheese and that she feels that there is a cheese for every situation or emotion. On the other hand, Phoebe said she enjoys eating Reese's peanut butter cups for no other reason than “they are just delicious and make me happy.” Others told us that they don't rely on food or snacks to make them feel better. 

As you can see, there is a snack for every occasion. Whether it’s a big wheel of cheese or pasta salad on a summer lake day, food plays a tremendous role in everyday life. Hopefully this article helps guide you to the most beneficial feeling foods.

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